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Sunstone
14-07-2004, 10:02 PM
Dear guys,

Without a doubt property used wisely creates powerful resources at our disposal. In this I feel this also creates a type of social responsibility for each one of us, to make a difference, something that will continue to “do good” when we are no longer here.

For myself I will build a library further helping an area that has helped myself.

What legacy will you leave behind?

Cheers,

Sunstone.

Garry K
15-07-2004, 09:50 AM
Hi Sun

Agree with your sentiments, but not sure what my legacy will be.

I know that John Fitzgerald (of Seven steps to wealth), a Qld developer, commenced a school for teenagers with "difficulties" conforming to public schooling. It's called Toogoolawa, in SEQ,and he essentially funds it. Also gets personally invovled taking kids on camping trips etc.
He also askes investors to support the school as well.

That concept appeals to me.

GarryK

Sunstone
19-07-2004, 11:06 PM
Dear Garry,

Nice touch bringing up John Fitzgerald and Toogoolawa. Although I have not yet met him I do respect what he writes and through Toogoolawa he certainly has built a worthly legacy.

Interesting however that others on the forum have not yet ventured onto this thread.

Why is that? Is this something that our "Ordinary Millionaires" have not thought of? Who here would not like to leave behind a legacy? Is there a fear factor in writing down something that one is scared to mentally commit to?

Other comments?

Cheers,

Sunstone.

Jimmyjamjars
19-07-2004, 11:36 PM
Sunstone,
There is no fear factor involved. Yes, I do have a few things in mind that I want to leave behind for the next generation but I simply will put them in to action when the time comes. I feel that by putting the grandiose down for everyone to read, I can basically put anything down, big note myself and no-one is any the wiser whether I follow it all through or if it was just lip service. Keep it mind, these are my opinions only.
JIM

Dear Garry,
Interesting however that others on the forum have not yet ventured onto this thread.

Why is that? Is this something that our "Ordinary Millionaires" have not thought of? Who here would not like to leave behind a legacy? Is there a fear factor in writing down something that one is scared to mentally commit to?

sbe
20-07-2004, 01:09 PM
My plan is once the family phase is over (raising children etc), and things settle, to look into missionary work, but with a twist.

We had a visitor to the church talking about how they are involved in helping to build / renovate old buildings into churches/schools/hospitals etc.

That appealed to me & my wife - we've got a lot of the skills, and some cool tools. Would be good to help others with them too...

But then, that's all still a ways off yet.....

bicko
20-07-2004, 04:25 PM
My main priority is to leave behind a legacy of practical social and financial knowledge for my children. On top of this however I would like to any wealth/power/influence to further the development of renewable energy.

Hopefully in another 12 years we won't be driving around in diesel/ulp vehicles (wishful thinking) and we won't be relying on coal and uranium for power.

thats what I want to achieve, to say at the end of the day I did something for our home.

cheers

bicko

wish-ga
29-07-2004, 01:24 PM
message deleted

Mr. Fabulous
29-07-2004, 06:45 PM
Jimmyjamjars,
I don't think Sunstone's intention was to big note himself or allow anyone else to do the same. Maybe the intention was to get people to think outside of their own little worlds and ask themselves 'What can I do for those less fortunate than I?' It never ceases to amaze me how self absorbed most people are - wealthy or not - and how much said people expect everything to be done for them/handed to them on a plate.
It's my opinion that if everyone, young, old, rich, poor were to think about how their actions affect others and what they could do to help others, then our world would be a much more liveable and happy place for everyone (and that includes the non-human beings that exist side by side with us).
My legacy will be to help homeless youth in some way. I'm doing that to a small extent now, by giving money to Youth Off The Streets and purchasing a copy of The Big Issue when I see a vendor around. It's not a huge amount, but it makes a difference to somebody.
Speaking of The Big Issue, how many of you ignore the vendors you see? Next time, give them some money, some for the mag and a little extra. They need it more than you do. Remember, everytime you purchase a copy, you're helping a homeless or unemployed person help themselves.

Rolf Latham
29-07-2004, 07:43 PM
Hi ML

So true

But for the Grace of God there go I is my motto,.........................


ta

rolf

Corsa
29-07-2004, 08:55 PM
Interesting however that others on the forum have not yet ventured onto this thread....Other comments?

Cheers,

Sunstone.


Dear Sunstone

I missed this thread so sorry I havent ventured into this thread as yet :)

But to be honest with you I havent thought about it too much so I guess you have at least triggered the thought process.

I feel that I am so much in the establishment phase, that I have a few mountains to climb before I can look back down and give back something back to the community.

The only contribution I really make now is to make some donations to my favourit charities of being Huntingtons & Breast Cancer (www.donations.com.au (http://www.donations.com.au/) ) and dont give nearly as much as I should but I am not that hard on myself.

I think your idea of a library is a wonderful idea to share with the forum.

Best Wishes

Corsa

Sunstone
29-07-2004, 10:17 PM
I feel that by putting the grandiose down for everyone to read, I can basically put anything down, big note myself and no-one is any the wiser whether I follow it all through or if it was just lip service.


Dear JJJ,

There is always a risk of that. However before we can create something physically it must be first created in our own mind.

I remember your post in my Good Deeds thread below. Your post certainly inspired myself. No doubt it was an inspiration to others.

http://www.somersoft.com/forums/showthread.php?t=14493
http://www.somersoft.com/forums/showpost.php?p=94213&postcount=11

These types of ideas encourage others. We do what we can everyday, life is too short to not appreciate, encourage and do..……





It's not a huge amount, but it makes a difference to somebody.

Nice touch Mark. The little bits all add up.


Dear Corsa/guys,

Thanks for the kind words. Whilst it may be early days for some it is good to start with the end in mind.

The library is a medium term goal for myself but one that I have been working towards for some time.

Cheers,

Sunstone.

Xtine
29-07-2004, 10:30 PM
Seems some people's idea of a legacy involves the concept of sharing, whether wealth, knowledge, etc. etc.

I have a small legacy (it's a start!) that perhaps my young neices will remember me by.

Occasionally, when I give them little gifts, I will give them an extra one.

E.g. Four of them stayed over in the school holidays and we all made chocolate muffins. There was enough for 3 each - one to keep, one to give away, and one to take home. Although they'd all assumed that their three muffins were labelled 'mine/mine/mine' and were hesitant at first, they soon warmed to the idea of giving one away. Especially, seeing the thankfulness on the face of the person who received it.

They were feelgood muffins because they made you feel good in the tummy as well as the heart.

'And what did I share?' you ask? I shared the 'gift of giving' of course!!

Mr. Fabulous
30-07-2004, 07:27 PM
Hahahahaha, excellent. Y'all are awesome. I've been a believer for some time now that giving is the best gift that one can receive. Whether that's giving money to a charity, building a library (great idea, by the way Sunstone) or giving cupcakes to someone for no reason whatsoever is irrelevant.
It's all about sharing whatever it is we have with the world that matters. All too often in our society there are far too many examples of take take take, but not giving anything back. For me, the best present I can receive is the smile and genuine thanks I get when I do something for someone else. Not doing so to make myself feel better, but doing it because I truly want to help a fellow being (again, this doesn't just mean humans, one of the reasons I choose to be vegetarian).
The greatest rewards that I have received personally for such a viewpoint are three friendships that I will treasure for the rest of my life. The people I speak of are all of the highest integrity, and give much much more than they receive. So Hiroko, Steve and Katrina, this one's for you!

Sunstone
02-09-2004, 10:15 PM
Dear guys,

A relative of mine always talked highly of Charles Viertel. Here are some parts of his story and the legacy he left behind.

Viertel, a low-profile Queensland foundation, is no small beer. With funds of about $100m, and annual grants totalling some $4m to $5m, it is probably the second largest in Australia behind the Ian Potter Foundation.

One of 11 children in a poor family at Kangaroo Point, Queensland, Charles Viertel graduated dux of Brisbane Central Technical High School and went on to complete a bachelor of commerce degree from the University of Queensland. He became a successful accountant, property developer and sharemarket investor, motivated, it is said, by a teacher who wrote on a blackboard that he owed threepence for school fees. Viertel left an estimated $60m in a discretionary trust when he died in 1992. Friends say his lifestyle was frugal.

Through the 1990s, the trust gave away more than $26m to hundreds of causes, including blindness, cancer, drug rehabilitation, the homeless, churches, Meals on Wheels and St Vincent de Paul. Sylvia Viertel, who died a few years before Charles, had suffered from bad eyesight so prevention of blindness was a cause Charles favoured. But Viertel’s will gave his three trustees discretion to make grants within broad guidelines that half of the income go to projects involving children and youth problems, underprivilege and homelessness, and the alleviation of hardship for older people, while the other half would go to medical research.

There are some provisos. One says the trustees should disregard charities with high administrative expenses. The will names three organisations – Queensland Cancer Fund, Australian Foundation for the Prevention of Blindness (Queensland division) and the Salvation Army (Queensland) Property Trust – that the trustees should consider. But some say this is only in the event of excess funds being available.

Viertel’s three nominated trustees were Brian Gibbon as chairman, George Curphey and ANZ Executors and Trustees. Gibbon was a colleague of Viertel for 42 years, and at 21 was sent by Viertel to run his Quill stationery plant in Sydney. Viertel’s business administration was apparently as frugal as his personal life, as Gibbon received minimal holidays, no superannuation and no shareholding in the company. But on Viertel’s death he found himself entrusted with dispersing Viertel’s huge wealth to charities.

Gibbon, a religious man described by friends as a visionary, was responsible for many of the foundation’s initiatives, including senior medical research fellowships and its $1m-a-year Aboriginal causes program. The Fred Hollows Foundation was granted $250,000 a year for three years for its “Healthy Tucker Project” to improve Aboriginal health as a means of preventing blindness. Other indigenous grants involved leadership programs, nurse training, economic development and mental health. The foundation set up a committee to advise on Aboriginal grants, including Ahern and Sally Goold, president of the Congress of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nurses and a member of the National Reconciliation Council.

Under Gibbon’s leadership, and apparently with the support of ANZ Trustees, the foundation’s core funds grew to some $100m and its annual grants to $4m-$5m a year.

http://bulletin.ninemsn.com.au/bulletin/eddesk.nsf/printing/44D09D81356D1883CA256A5700036CEE

Sylvia and Charles Viertel
Charles Viertel was one of eleven children born into the poor family of a German farther and English mother. An achiever since childhood, he graduated dux of the Brisbane Central Technical High School and was awarded a Bachelor of Commerce degree from the University of Queensland.
He had a strong commitment to helping people who helped themselves, offering a hand of support when the need was great. He gave quietly and without expectation of public recognition. One of the projects he supported during his lifetime was the establishment of a Chair of Ophthalmology at the University of Queensland.

In leaving a $60 million charitable foundation at the full discretion of his Trustees, Mr Viertel declared that it be the policy of his Trustees to disregard those charities with high administrative expenses.
He thus laid the framework for a Foundation which nurtured his characteristics of keeping an eye firmly fixed on achieving results and helping those willing to help themselves.

Sylvia Viertel was a quiet, gentle person who preferred the simple things in life to the corporate world in which her husband revelled. Sylvia and Charles married when they were both in the their 40s and she preferred always to remain in the background as a home maker and keen gardener.
Sylvia Viertel suffered from a debilitating eye disease which initiated Charles' interest in Ophthalmology.

http://www.indiginet.com.au/catsin/viertel.html

Cheers,

Sunstone.

Brenda Irwin
07-09-2004, 08:35 AM
I am interested in providing some sort of housing for the elderly and less priviledged. However, this may take more than my lifetime to achieve.

For the moment, I will keep the idea in my mind, whilst I grow and consolidate my financial position. In the hereafter, I hope the Salvation Army and my own offspring may be able to provide more of an impact in those areas, using the seed of finance which my legacy would provide. :)

yadreamin
07-09-2004, 08:09 PM
Why wait till one has passed over?

there is a huge shortage of blood in Australia, something money cannot buy.
So l give it now, "better warm than cold"
Why not put it on your TOO DO LIST THIS WEEK.
Also put on your licence to donate your organs.
One of the formites tags are {sorry can,t think who at the moment]
"look after your body as it,s the only place we have to live in"

sometimes l think the most obvious is right under our noses.
no matter what investment or life vehicle one is driving.


cheers yadreamin

geoffw
07-09-2004, 10:20 PM
I lived in England 1988-1990. So they won't let me give blood.

I'm not a demented cow. Honest.

Bill.L
07-09-2004, 11:02 PM
OK Geoff,

I give up. I can't work it out. Which is it then, are you demented or a cow?? :D :D

from Bill, in one of those demented cow moods. :confused:

bye

Carolyn
24-09-2004, 05:36 PM
Some Sobering thoughts...
Have to agree giving gives you such a buzz.

For each new property we buy, we sponsor an overseas child. For me it is something more real and emotional to receive letters and pictures from a life that we are helping, than just my bricks and mortor.

I too have read John Fitzgeralds stuff - very inspiring. I have no problem with wanting the financial rewards that my husband and I are heading towards, but very keen to share that around in both time, knowledge and financial resources.

Most importantly, for us ,it is also about teaching the values of giving with our children - our greatest legacy.

Carolyn

Sunfish
24-09-2004, 06:19 PM
Why wait till one has passed over?

there is a huge shortage of blood in Australia, something money cannot buy.
So l give it now, "better warm than cold"
Why not put it on your TOO DO LIST THIS WEEK.
Also put on your licence to donate your organs.
One of the formites tags are {sorry can,t think who at the moment]
"look after your body as it,s the only place we have to live in"

sometimes l think the most obvious is right under our noses.
no matter what investment or life vehicle one is driving.


cheers yadreamin
Attitudes change. Dad, a WW1 vet, gave gallons of blood until his late seventies but I doubt Mum ever donated. She did donate her time to the Red Cross Blood Unit though, taking blood from men. There must have been a more distinct "devision of responsibilities" I suppose.

My lady, has taken over where Dad left off. Gives every 10-12 weeks and tries to get others in her office to join her but it seems the young lads are reluctant. The girls seem more likely to front.

Before donating, you sign a legal document that asks questions which may be too onerous for party boys.(?)

T

Aceyducey
24-09-2004, 07:44 PM
hmm - if the shortage of blood is that big shouldn't we all want to hang on to as much of our own as we can?

Maybe the blood market should be opened up to capitalism.....I'm sure that supply & demand would reasonably quickly balance out.

Cheers,

Aceyducey

Sunfish
24-09-2004, 07:51 PM
hmm - if the shortage of blood is that big shouldn't we all want to hang on to as much of our own as we can?

Maybe the blood market should be opened up to capitalism.....I'm sure that supply & demand would reasonably quickly balance out.

Cheers,

Aceyducey
Wonderful thing, capitalism! Outside every blood bank is your resident dealer, happy to trade the dollars in hand for injectable substances!

Volunteers are Oz's greatest assett!

Sunstone
05-11-2004, 08:39 AM
Dear guys,

From yesterday's Australian.

Cheers,

Sunstone.

Developing a passion for charity work
Guy Allenby -November 04, 2004

IF there's one thing Pat Sergi enjoys more than making money, it's giving it away. As he puts it, keeping his property development company, Tesrol, motoring along is "very important" but "the big satisfaction is the fundraising".

Making a buck to "keep the family happy and comfortable" was, he added, a big slice of his life but the real ambition was to establish Australia's largest fundraising foundation.

His dream is to raise $100 million, to be invested and fund a host of charities to the tune of an annual $10 million into perpetuity.

"I want to be able to leave a legacy when I go," said Mr Sergi, sitting in a wingback chair in the dark timber-panelled sitting room of the company's Sydney offices.

"I'd like to leave around $10 million of funds, to be given away every year."

While some people of wealth and influence like to let it be known that they dabble in a little charity work, Mr Sergi's philanthropy is of a much bigger, more upfront and heartfelt flavour.

When he isn't dreaming up ways to help others, Mr Sergi is a director of the Tesrol group of companies. Tesrol's other director is Jorge Fernandez.

Most recently the group has been responsible for Star of the Sea, a $100 million 52-apartment development at Terrigal on the NSW Central Coast.

Star of the Sea has been built on a 10,500sqm parcel of land on Terrigal's waterfront and involved the purchase of the 8000sqm Star of the Sea Catholic School and the acquisition of some surrounding residential sites.

Mr Sergi purchased one of Star of the Sea's penthouses for his family.

Star of the Sea is "the jewel in the crown" of Tesrol's property development division, which was founded in 1986, he said. In the 18 years since, the company had completed more than 50 projects, including truck depots, goods factories and a shopping centre in Liverpool.

More recently, Tesrol's projects have included Manhattan, a $70 million redevelopment of the old Manhattan Hotel site in Sydney's Elizabeth Bay into 53 luxury apartments, and the $10 million refurbishment of former Bond stores two and three at Sydney's Walsh Bay for commercial use.

The company is also working on a residential development at Ettalong Beach on the NSW Central Coast.

But it's the charity work that remains very much Mr Sergi's "passion" and that takes up "at least" 20 per cent of his time.

"It's a pastime for me and it's a good stress reliever. I love it," he said. He's been involved with the Spastic Centre for 17 years and is chairman of the Italian Affair Committee and "we've raised millions of dollars".

He's also involved in Rotary and with the Fred Hollows Foundation.

"I've organised two balls for them. One was at the casino here in Sydney and we raised $600,000 for the night. I've been involved with the Bali Appeal for which we raised about $480,000."

While other people go "to the pub or to the races" in their spare time, he said, "to me I'd rather be doing fundraising and help someone else that is more in need".

Mr Sergi, who received an OAM in 1996 for services to the community (specifically for his work for the Spastic Centre, Fred Hollows Foundation and other charities), said he'd happily sit at the computer at home until midnight indulging his pastime: plotting ways to extract money from the fortunate and push it towards those in need. Only now he believes he's come up with a means to do it in an even bigger way, through the Paint a Rainbow Foundation.

"I've been working on this for the past 12 months but I've been thinking about it for at least seven years."

Paint a Rainbow Foundation was slated for a formal launch in May 2005, Mr Sergi said, adding that he'd already had "pledges of $100,000 and I've got one guy who is waiting for it to be launched to give me a million dollars". "I've spoken to Alan Jones. He supports it and I'm sure he's going to be on my committee," he said. "People know me as being involved in fundraising.

"They know that I'm doing it for the right reasons and people will give you a cheque. If you ask for a hundred they might give you a thousand."

The plans aren't "concrete" yet, he pointed out, but the foundation would likely raise funds via four major functions every year: an annual ball; a golf day; a race day; and an annual cruise.

In the first year, $200,000 would be donated to a list of charities, with the balance of the funds to be invested.

"Anything we raise above that we are going to invest 50 per cent in real estate, 20 per cent in the money market and 20 per cent in stocks and shares."

The final 10 per cent would be kept as a "float" by the foundation.

These investments, meanwhile, would be made by a "wishlist" of leading experts (Mr Sergi hasn't approached some of them yet, so he did not want it revealed who they probably were).

The experts will make investment recommendations and the board of Paint a Rainbow Foundation will "say yay or nay".

"The board will meet every six weeks or two months. Everything is voluntary."

It's hoped that in the coming years of the foundation's life that more can be donated directly each year and more can be put away into "long-term investments".

Mr Sergi's dream is that one day Paint a Rainbow Foundation will be worth $100million and be pumping $10 million each year into worthy causes that will include the "Heart Foundation, the Children's Hospital and all the other hospitals, cancer research, the Spastic Centre, the Salvation Army, St Vincent de Paul and The Red Cross".

"I think that by investing it properly you are forever going to be giving out so much money each year.

"People ask me: 'What are you doing it for'?

"It's not because you want the recognition or for what you are going to get. You do it because you like doing it.

"This is a passion [I have] for doing something for my community. This is an appreciation of what life's been to me."

http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/common/story_page/0,5744,11276460%255E25658,00.html

markpatric
02-12-2004, 02:29 PM
I do small things, but my answer is "I don`t know yet", and judging by how long I`ve thought about it I may never know, but one things for sure when I do, noone will know I did a thing, it sickens me to see charities with someones name all over it.
The best legacy you can give is to teach young people to have common sense and be tolerant and to try to do everything you do in the right spirit with a strong free will. :)

Corsa
02-12-2004, 03:19 PM
.....but one things for sure when I do, noone will know I did a thing, it sickens me to see charities with someones name all over it.

Hi Markpatric

Can you explain for me what you mean by this?

Thanks

Corsa

duncan_m
02-12-2004, 03:29 PM
noone will know I did a thing, it sickens me to see charities with someones name all over it


There DOES seem to be a trend for sporting personalities to start foundations "The XXX YYY Foundation"...

Call my cynical.. but I see very generous taxation treatment for certain aspects of the running of Charitable Organisations, especially with regard to FBT and of course Income Tax.. I wonder about the remuneration for Trustees and other employed individuals within the Charity.. is it the next great tax scam? Set up a charity, donate money to it, have the public donate money to it, expense much of it away within the Charity.. I have no evidence, just a feeling..

markpatric
02-12-2004, 03:48 PM
Yes also pop stars royalty you name it, but anyway it seems that no matter how much money we have we never have enough to help others unless there is some tax deduction, then again there are probably other more selfish ways to avoid tax. I think any kind of help is better than nothing, it`s more than I do at present so I take back the cynical comment. :o

duncan_m
02-12-2004, 03:54 PM
Yes also pop stars royalty you name it, but anyway it seems that no matter how much money we have we never have enough to help others unless there is some tax deduction, then again there are probably other more selfish ways to avoid tax. I think any kind of help is better than nothing, it`s more than I do at present so I take back the cynical comment. :o

In some ways.. even if it was legitimate, it kinda dilutes the available charity dollars, more overhead, more administration, more spent on marketing.. I'd have more respect for them if they were actively raising money for well-respected charities.

I donate money to the same charity once each year, if I gave a little bit of money to each charity I feel my contribution would on the whole, be less.

wealthyjay
02-12-2004, 04:11 PM
I go with the idea that charity should be given anonymously, therefore there is no expectation on that money as charity should be. I feel it becomes meaningless as soon as some value is attached to it.

Also, if you give and the recipient knows about it, they are often back again for more and then it becomes a "have-to" out of expectation, and therefore destroys the intent.

To answer the question, I plan to either offer myself as an educator/mentor to children/teenagers to bridge the gap between schools and real life, an area I feel is sorely lacking leaving many without the skills to be a success.

Corsa
02-12-2004, 04:25 PM
Years ago, I once made a very naive comment at a dinner party about feeling resentful about door to door charity salesperson and how they got paid to do it which was unfair to the charity, the charity should receive all the monies I declared.

A person at the dinner party replied that if it had not been for the door to door charity salesperson then the charity would not have received the $1 and even if the salesperson received half of that and the charity received 50 cents then half of something was better than half of nothing.

I have never forgotten this conversation and it certainly put me back in my place :o

On a brighter note, today I received my new world vision sponsor childs details "Zhuwana Kamfana" who is 6 and lives in Malawi. It has made my day, along with Glebe's post about me earlier today on the equity protected loans :)

I decided to get a sponser child when I found out that one of the guys from work as 3 sponsor children and 5 children of his own and another guy (who happens to be on the World Vision advertisments with his wife) has a few as well.

I think everyone should tell the world what support they give to charities rather than feel that they have to keep quite and not raise attention to the fact that they are giving and not want to be judged by other people thinking that they are doing it for a tax dodge or that they are tooting there own horn. And I endorse and support celebreties putting there name and face to lend support to raise funds for worthy causes.

Every little bit counts and people are welcome to give as much or as little as they can afford or they wish.

duncan_m
02-12-2004, 04:40 PM
Corsa,

Nice balanced view as always.. I'm sure anyone starting a charity to get the tax dodge is indeed in the minority.

Perhaps sportstars have the ability to prompt their fan base into making a donation that perhaps would not have been otherwise forthcoming.. It does seem on the whole a positive development in hindsight :-)

markpatric
02-12-2004, 06:55 PM
Duncan your probably right in some cases.
Wealthy Jay I agree, to give your time is much harder to do and ultimately worth more than money, in more ways than one.

House_Keeper
26-12-2004, 11:05 AM
What legacy will I leave behind? I haven't really though about it much. I know I am making a difference for my family and my kids. At work, I strive to be an example of integrity, kindness, and service.

I don't know if I will have a huge fortune to give away when I am old. I hope I will be able to. I do give away some to charity now. However, I believe everybody can make difference by being good role models, especially for our kids.

Cheers,

Ali G
26-12-2004, 12:09 PM
I donate to a couple of animal protection organisations on a monthly basis and also to emergency appeals when they arise. It does not seem like much but it is all I can manage for the moment. I try to make a difference within my neighbourhood though, through many of the little things others have mentioned. I am about a third of the age of all of my neighbours (!!) so myself and my better half have visited them all, given them our names and numbers and encouaged them to call us should they need anything, big or small. One of them called us the next day just to say thank you. Not exactly leaving a legacy but as others have noted, all of these things add to the happiness of the community, even if only in a very small way. I also see being vegetarian as a small contribution of mine.

My goal and dream has always been to buy large tracts of old growth forest and land which provides a home to endangered species... and just leave it there, untouched.

Interesting thread guys!

Ecogirl
04-01-2005, 12:06 PM
My legacy will be a land bank.
I got the idea when i was in Mackay last month. I want to buy land that the habitat is still intact and connects with a functioning protected habitat to preserve species diversity.

Then I will put a covenant on it to disallow development on it down the track. That fits in with how I live my life and what I want to preserve for future generations. Not very exciting at all but works for me.

Ecogirl

Kerri
05-01-2005, 03:56 PM
My plan (I am yet to buy my first IP), is to sponsor a child through World Vision for every IP I buy. I saw that someone else who posted does this, and I am feeling pretty eager to get on with it. (Need to sell or refinance my PPOR first).

Another thing I love the idea of doing is lease options. I had a really hard time getting into the property market, due to always paying rent and not being able to save a decent deposit. It would be really cool to know that I am helping someone buy their own home. I am still working out the details of it in my head, but from what I can tell, it can be worked to be a totally win/win situation for both parties.

XBenX
06-01-2005, 07:50 AM
I thought I had already posted in this thread... Ive read it a *few* times.

Ive helped start the largest basketball club in our association - we are one of the only clubs (in our area) that doesnt give its mgmt/committee some type of renumeration.

My personal plan to give back to the community is along similar lines - Id love to start a ski(snow) club which provides training, sponsorship, facilities etc.

In addition to that I spose Ill have to get around to doing my doctorate and contribute some original thought to economic community (Or at least try)